Sports Massage “Hurts So Good”

Sports Massage Really Does Hurt So Good

According to Johnson Memorial Health’s blog, Sports Massage Really Does Hurt So Good.

 “It’s a good kind of hurt.” Sports Massage Therapy may not have the same ambiance or effects of a luxurious spa treatment, but the benefits will improve your athletic performance and help injury recovery. 

There’s no need to suffer with tight or sore muscles for weeks on end when regular therapy can help expedite recovery. The deep tissue rubdown can be painful at first but the effects on conditioning and improvement on performance is well worth the initial discomfort.

Many professional, collegiate and high school athletic programs integrate Sports Massage into their training programs, according to the American Massage Therapy Association. Massages take place before or after competition. And, while Sports Massage is more physically intense than a spa massage, you’ll still walk away with less stress and tension.

The specific technique used in Sports Massage Therapy gives your muscles more oxygen and nutrients necessary for quick recovery and to prepare them for competition. To give you a better idea of how exactly this happens, we broke down the benefits for you.

Pacing

Often fast-paced, Sports Massage Therapy can be administered before or after competition or a workout. It is designed to increase flexibility and reduce soreness – and can be customized by the sport or athlete’s body type. Typically pre-event massages are performed at a faster pace to prepare the muscles for competition; stimulating them to increase speed and flexibility.

Technique

The Certified Sports Massage Therapist administering the massage uses specific techniques that apply heavier pressure on layers of muscles and deep tissues. This helps to:

  • Get blood flowing back to the heart
  • Deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients to the muscles and tissue

The goal is to remove knots and tension within the muscles. The tissue movement also removes waste products and toxins from your tissues and muscles through the blood and lymphatic system. Drinking plenty of water after a massage helps to move these out of your body.  — with the help of lots of water following the massage.

Physical Benefits

While a Sports Massage can leave you sore for about a day or two, the therapy directly benefits the muscles and integrated cardiovascular system. Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine said the increased and enhanced blood circulation and relaxed muscles helps to:

  • Relieve muscle tension
  • Reduce soreness
  • Make for faster recovery
  • Increase range of motion and flexibility

Sports Massage Therapy can also prevent or relieve Delayed Onset Muscle soreness by encouraging blood and lymph flow throughout the body and preventing muscle fatigue.

Psychological Benefits

Besides helping the body recover physically, Sports Massage Therapy also gets you into competition mod and mentally prepares you for your next workout. During the release of tight muscles, the body increases dopamine and serotonin levels. This reduces stress, tension and anxiety by activating your parasympathetic nervous system.

Therapist Qualifications

A therapist’s credentials help give you a clearer idea of a therapist’s capabilities and competency surrounding different massage therapies. In general, according to the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA), credentials include:

  • Licensing
  • Board Certification
  • Education and Training with an accredited school
  • Membership with a professional association like AMTA, NCBTMB or ABMP.

To ensure that your therapist is understanding of sports-related injuries or prevention, it’s recommended that you look for a therapist with certification in particular modalities used in sports therapy, for example, myofascial techniques

Make sure to ask them about any questions or concerns you have about Sports Massage Therapy.

Originally Posted by Johnson Memorial Health

 

For professional Sports Massage in Salt Lake City Contact Zen Massage (801) 467-3529

5520 South Van Winkle Expy

Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Value of Massage Therapy for Surgical Pain

Massage Therapy for Surgical Pain

Massage therapy can be effective for reducing pain intensity/severity and anxiety in patients undergoing surgical procedures.

That was the conclusion of a collaborative meta-analysis of research on massage therapy for pain conducted by Samueli Institute, commissioned by the Massage Therapy Foundation, with support from the American Massage Therapy Association.

The review and analysis was published in the September issue of the journal Pain Medicine.

The study concludes that patients should consider massage therapy as a therapeutic option to help manage their pain and anxiety from surgical procedures.

About the Study

This systematic review and meta-analysis was the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy and effectiveness in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life outcomes for people with various types of surgical pain and anxiety.

Source

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(801) 467-3529

5520 South Van Winkle Expy

Salt Lake City, UT 84117

 

Massaging the Psoas

How Massage Therapists Treat Psoas

The psoas is a deep-seated core muscle connecting the lumbar vertebrae to the femur. The psoas major is the biggest and strongest player in a group of muscles called the hip flexors: together they contract to pull the thigh and the torso toward each other.

It is one of the more sensitive areas a Massage Therapist can treat. Getting in and working on the psoas is a skill in itself. It takes practice and some clear communication with your patient.

I want to share a technique that is as useful as it is uncomfortable, this is the way I used to do it.

The psoas has spinal attachments and is more than just a hip flexor. Some studies think it functions as a stabilizer. Since it attaches to the spine, the only way to release it manually is to go DEEP.

This technique will help:

  • Female runners with SI problems (lack of hip extension causing SI and lumbar hypermobility, plus inhibition of hip abductor/extensors)
  • Older patients with stenosis (lack of hip extension causes lumbar hyperextension, further closing the stenosis)
  • Hip capsular patterns – will improve hip external rotation
  • Posteriorly rotated ilium
  • Pt’s with diffuse anterolateral thigh complaints from compression of femoral nerve
  • Pt’s with spondylolisthesis may help in conjunction with soft tissue work to the paraspinals.
  • And a stabilization program

Your patient should lay supine with knees and hips flexed. Use an even finger grip, both 3rd and 4th fingertips with your elbows flared out so that your fingertips have even contact. Start about 2-3″ laterally to the umbilicus and slowly move from superficial to deep until you can’t move any further.

The abdominal contents will move out of the way. If you move too quickly, you will activate the rectus abdominus and the contraction will push you out.

How do you know you’re on it?

Here are two signs to make sure:

  • It’s not pulsing, if it is, go more lateral as you’re on the descending aorta!
  • Ask the patient to slightly flex their hip; as soon as they do, you should feel it contract under your fingertips

Start with oscillations, and you can progress to functional release movements starting with heelslide (you push proximally as patient slides heel distally), ipsilateral upper extremity elevation, combination upper extremity elevation and heelslide, then anterior pelvic tilts.

The last is the most uncomfortable, and maybe even the first time you can get a patient to posteriorly pelvic tilt correctly, as they want to move away from your hands! Perform for 5-7 minutes or until you feel a change. Reassess function, ROM, special test, or however you came to the conclusion the patient had a restricted psoas to begin with.

Techniques For Massage Therapists To Work Psoas Pain Free

Let’s be clear, you are nowhere near the psoas when doing a release, but this is the new way I do it.

I am just targeting the area around and above, and am very general to release lower quarter tone anteriorly, that’s about it.

Why you should use this

  • it doesn’t hurt
  • it rapidly improves hip and lumbar motion
    • if a patient needs sidegliding in standing for an ipsilateral lower quadrant issue, but is unable to move without discomfort

Patient:

  • supine, in hooklying
  • at least the involved lower extremity needs to be bent at the hip and knee

MT:

  • standing on the involved side
  • use either the pads of digits 3-4 of both hands or even easier, an EDGE Mobility Ball (any ball will do)
  • assess resistance to superficial to deep pressure lateral to the umbilicus on one side versus the other
  • the side with increased resistance is the side you should treat

Technique:

  • lightly apply superficial to deep pressure, it SHOULD NOT cause any pain
  • at the point of resistance that is highest, have the patient complete 3-5 diaphragmatic breaths
  • make sure they exhale fully
  • the exhalation will help reduce tone autonomically

re-test the limited hip and/or lumbar motion.

As it is with so many other techniques in Massage Therapy communication and consent is key. Make sure when attempting this treatment that if you feel the pulse, you move off of it quickly as you do not want to compress the descending aorta. Whether you’re helping someone with stenosis, spondylolisthesis or just SI issues treating the psoas can give you and your patients greater success in treatment. 

Source: MTDC

 

Book Your Massage in SLC today!

(801) 467-3529

5520 South Van Winkle Expy
Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Stretching Is Essential | Zen Massage

Stretching Is Essential

Body Basics

Have you ever seen a cat get up and start moving without stretching? 

If you’ve ever watched a cat you’ll have noticed each time they begin to move they stretch! They listen to their bodies! With busy daily life, we humans tend to ignore our most basic needs.

When we don’t stretch regularly, we overuse, fatigue, shorten and tighten our muscles and the connecting tissues. This leads to decreased circulation, reduced flexibility, and an increased risk of injury or disease. 

Tune-in to what your body is trying to tell you! Notice that compelling feeling to stretch when you wake up? And again, at the end of the day when you’re tired? That is nature’s way of telling you that you need to move! Move more oxygen around your body . . . And yet a lot of us spend our days sitting at our desks barely moving.

Staying flexible as we get older is something we can all work towards. After all, loss of mobility is a slow process that creeps up on you. Many of us don’t recognize it’s happening until our bodies become imbalanced, compensation sets in, and we begin to suffer pain and discomfort.

NOW is the time to start helping your body perform as it was designed to so that it can continue to perform over time. After all, stretching is a workout in itself!

Daily Stretching Benefits

Stretching techniques can take as little as 10 minutes, but provide a multiple of benefits, including:

  • Improved posture, circulation, and range of motion
  • Accelerated recovery from injury
  • Reduced muscle tension
  • Relief from muscle soreness, strains, or spasms
  • Improved athletic performance
  • Enhanced ability to relax
  • Balance promoted throughout the body

Proper Stretching Technique

It is essential to practice proper stretching techniques.

  • Warm up first
  • Hold each stretch for at least 30 seconds
  • Don’t bounce
  • Focus on a pain-free stretch
  • Relax and breathe freely
  • Stretch both sides
  • Stretch before and after activity

Here are a few good stretches to try:

Be sure to check in with your physical therapist before starting any stretching program. 

Stretching regularly can help your body and joints move more freely, allowing you to enjoy full functional mobility.

Add a Zen Massage

Stretching is wonderfully beneficial for your body, but add in a massage once or twice a month and your body will be thanking you well into your old age!

Book your Massage online @ ZenMassage.net

Or call  (801) 467-3529

Zen Massage | Luxury Massage in Salt Lake City, Utah

5520 South Van Winkle Expy

Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Massage & CrossFit | SLC

MASSAGE IS AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT TO CROSSFIT RECOVERY

Massages feel great and they provide excellent recovery assistance for CrossFit athletes. Getting a regular massage once a month or more can help you reduce soreness and risk of injury while increasing mobility so you can perform better.

During high-intensity exercise, lactic acid and general toxins from acidity increase in your muscles. Your body can naturally clear lactic acid and toxins with time and rest, however, massage can help expedite the process, especially when you are working out often.

OTHER BENEFITS OF MASSAGE INCLUDE:
Massage lengthens fascia and muscle easing it back into place. This increases range of motion and has the added benefit of making your muscles look more toned.
Increases blood flow and circulation getting more oxygen into your body.
Decreases and anxiety and stress.
Helps reduce pain and inflammation in the joints, tendons, nerves, and bones.


THE BEST TIMES TO GET A MASSAGE:
At least 45 minutes after you have completed your workout for the day.
During recovery periods – rest days.
3 days before a competition or race. This will help improve your range of motion and mobility for your competition.
After a competition or race to help you recover quickly.

 

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR MASSAGE
You may find that your muscles are sore the next 24 – 48 hours after a massage. Help your body recover and get the most benefits from your massage by doing these few things:

Drink lots of water before and after your massage. Being properly hydrated assists with lymphatic drainage and blood flow.
Do a cold plunge right after your massage. This helps prevent toxins from reentering the muscles.
Practice Yoga or stretch an hour or more after the massage to assists the toxins to leave your body.
Use heat packs or have a warm bath with Epsom salts to reduce muscle tenderness.
Get a good nights sleep.

Book your Massage online @ ZenMassage.net

Or call  (801) 467-3529

Zen Massage | Luxury Massage in Salt Lake City, Utah
5520 South Van Winkle Expy
Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Massage for Skiers | Knee Injuries Utah

This area of the body has garnered some skiing notoriety, for good reason: the knee.

How Can Sports Massage and Deep Tissue Massage Help Rehabilitate Knee Injuries for Skiers?

Knee injuries account for 30-40% of all reported skiing injuries. Because of the amount of landing and cutting, with sudden changes of direction, skiing puts a lot of pressure on your muscles and joints, particularly the hips and knees. And when muscle imbalances exist, injury can occur. For example, uncontrolled landings play a large role in skiing injury; if your hip abductors and muscles of the pelvis have a propensity towards tightness, they are unable to fully stabilize your body in a landing or a fall. This leaves the lion’s share of responsibility for stabilization to your knees. And that’s not what they are built for. At high speed, a sudden twist or turn to attempt to avoid a crash or soften a landing will impact the most vulnerable body part involved in such movement, often resulting in knee ligament tears or strains.

This is one of the reasons why a strength-training regimen is so important for creating muscular balance for skiers. Building up strength in the larger muscles in the inner and outer thighs provides a better network of support for the smaller, more volatile ligaments surrounding and supporting your knee, and helps ensure stability and endurance in skiing. Pre-season exercises are key to developing muscle strength in the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, and core muscles.

Most knee injuries that are incurred while skiing are ligament strains or tears. Symptoms often include pain, swelling, and a restricted range of motion around the injured ligament. Injuries are graded in severity; less severe strains may be treated with rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory measures, while more serious ruptures may require immobilization and even surgery.


How can Massage Therapy Help with Knee Injuries?


The Massage Therapy approach I best like taking is to nip knee injuries incurred through skiing right in the bud, before you even put on your goggles. Pre-season Sports Massage Therapy for skiers is pointed towards identifying and addressing any muscle imbalances. We will attempt to decrease hypertonicity in your hip abductors. We will keep your hamstrings flushed out and encourage strengthening exercises. We will release any tightness in your quadriceps. All of these measures help ensure that you are working with a proper, balanced body mechanism that will support healthy knee function.

But what about receiving Massage Therapy treatment after a knee injury for the purpose of rehabilitation?

When dealing with a strained or torn ligament, there’s not a lot that we can do directly to the acute injury source. However, we can employ Deep Tissue Massage to focus our work on creating change in the structure around it, by improving circulation to the outlying areas. We promote the healing process by keeping the soft tissue as healthy as possible.

In addition, many people recovering from an injury feel generally uncomfortable; the pain and sudden state of immobilization can throw your nervous system into a state of chaos and frustration. Massage Therapy sedates the nervous system, promotes a healthy balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, and helps your reaction to the injury not be so devastating.

And of course, if you’re hobbling around on crutches, you may find yourself overworking previously underused upper body muscles! Your traps, lats, muscles of the shoulder, forearms, and wrists may suffer secondary consequences. So we can take care of those as well, in your Massage Therapy session.

Sports Massage and Deep Tissue Massage can help keep you off those pesky crutches and on the slopes.

Book your Sports Massage @ ZenMassage.net

(801) 467-3529
5520 South Van Winkle Expy
Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Golfer’s Elbow Care & Prevention

Repetitive motion injuries, such as Golfer’s Elbow, are on the rise. 

If you begin having an intense pain in your inner elbow and forearm, or have difficulty gripping and lifting things, you may be suffering from a condition known as golfer’s elbow, which, occurs as a direct result of repetitive motion, generally done incorrectly, over a long period of time.

You don’t have to play golf to get golfer’s elbow

  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Bowling
  • Football
  • Archery
  • Baseball
  • Carpentry
  • Plumbing

All of the above can cause Golfer’s Elbow or medial epicondylitis. It happens when repetitive motion irritates the common wrist flexor tendons near their elbow. The irritation causes pain and decreased functional use of your elbow.

For athletes, Golfer’s Elbow is often brought on by using the wrong equipment, like a golf club or tennis racket that is too heavy or that has a grip that is too large.

Symptoms typically include

  • Pain on the inner, or medial side of your elbow
  • Forearm pain
  • Difficulty gripping and lifting items
  • Pain when flexing your wrist

The key to preventing golfer’s elbow is to avoid overuse. If you feel any pain in your elbow during an activity, stop before it gets worse.

Treatments

A few sessions with your sports massage therapist may be in order to help you gain control of your condition and get back to normal activity.

Sports massage is beneficial for Golfer’s Elbow and for rehabilitation of previous injuries. At Zen Massage our therapists work on the injury location as well as on the muscle groups associated with the injury that may be causing additional pain from over-compensation due to the injury.

Stretches can also be helpful in controlling the symptoms of golfer’s elbow. These should be simple stretches and should not cause pain, and if they do they should be stopped until the pain resolves.

Exercises, also simple ones can be done to help strengthen the muscles and tendons involved with golfers’ elbow, by building up the muscles using proper motions you can help prevent the problem from returning.

Golfer’s elbow usually heals with simple treatment, and does not cause any long-term elbow problems. Treatment is rarely surgical, as this condition is well managed with a little rest and proper treatment and rehabilitation.

Note: Golfer’s elbow, or medial epicondylitis, should not be confused with tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis.

The massage therapists at ZEN Massage are ready to get you back in playing form. Contact us for Sports Massage Therapy in Salt Lake City

Sports / Injury Therapy — 45 minutes for $65

Call (801) 467-3529

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Learn More: http://zenmassage.net/sports-massage/

Sources:

http://zenmassage.net/sports-massage/

https://paindoctor.com/prevent-tennis-golfers-elbow/

https://www.verywell.com/kinesiology-tape-for-golfers-elbow-2696038

http://golftips.golfweek.com/cure-prevention-golf-elbow-20309.html

https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/golfers-elbow-prevention

https://www.verywell.com/physical-therapy-for-golfers-elbow-2696438